Money Tracker Blog by Judy Lawrence

posted in: Money Blog

Thank you for visiting my website and this blog page.  WELCOME!  

Feel free to ask questions regarding your personal and household personal finance issues or share a resource, insight, or whatever is stirring in your money world.

I’ll share some thoughts, articles I’ve written, links, other experts I respect and more as we go.

My goal with clients, and readers is to help raise consciousness, mindfulness, and awareness when it comes to YOUR money.

What I’m really looking forward to is hearing from you and getting a “financial pulse” of what’s happening with your money world in terms of your budget, partner or children money communication, spending issues and the like.

Here’s a question for you….

Are you noticing the subtle, insidious shift  going on with grocery prices?

Over the last many months, I’ve been watching as certain regular household products are put on a great sale for one to two months – “two for one”, “super dramatic discounts”!!

At the same time boldly showing the fabulous discounted price to distract you from the original price.

Later, when the sales are over, and prices are back to “normal”, that NEW price is now anywhere from 60 cents to a $1 more for the same item!  Wasn’t THAT sneaky?!!

It’s all very subtle and easy to not even notice as you go along filling your grocery basket.

And then you wonder why your money is not stretching like it used to…

What are you noticing??

Until next time, wishing you greater financial peace of mind.

Judy

 

 

 

 

 

 

13 Responses

  1. judylawrence
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    Glad you like the blog posts.

  2. Gracie F. Bray
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    jim cramer’s real money sane investing in an insane world is a fantastic book very easy to understand for the small investors.

    • judylawrence
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      Well, Gracie, it definitely seems like an insane world these days with challenging decisions. Glad to hear you found a book that keeps it simple for small investors.

  3. Leigh Chen
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    The book that inspired the movie COLLAPSE.The world is running short of energy-especially cheap, easy-to-find oil. Shortages, along with resulting price increases, threaten industrialized civilization, the global economy, and our entire way of life.In Confronting Collapse, author Michael C. Ruppert, a former LAPD narcotics officer turned investigative journalist, details the intricate connections between money and energy, including the ways in which oil shortages and price spikes triggered the economic crash that began in September 2008. Given the 96 percent correlation between economic growth and greenhouse gas emissions and the unlikelihood of economic growth without a spike in energy use, Ruppert argues that we are not, in fact, on the verge of economic recovery, but on the verge of complete collapse.Ruppert’s truth is not merely inconvenient. It is utterly devastating.But there is still hope. Ruppert outlines a 25-point plan of action, including the creation of a second strategic petroleum reserve for the use of state and local governments, the immediate implementation of a national Feed-in Tariff mandating that electric utilities pay 3 percent above market rates for all surplus electricity generated from renewable sources, a thorough assessment of soil conditions nationwide, and an emergency action plan for soil restoration and sustainable agriculture.

    • judylawrence
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      I do agree, the idea of economic recovery is certainly not showing up in the average consumer’s households, jobs or budgets so far.

  4. Rickie Schneider
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    As we emerge from the recession, a generation is searching for practical answers about how to succeed and make positive change in the world. With real-life success stories and practical advice and exercises, Making Good outlines how to find opportunities to effect change and make money. These opportunities are not just for entrepreneurs and Fortune 500 companies: Making Good shows step-bystep how any person can achieve financial autonomy, capitalize on global changes to infrastructure, and learn from everyday success stories–providing the skills and insights this generation needs to succeed and build careers and lives of consequence.

    • judylawrence
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      Thanks Rickie, Yes, this generation definitely will need to think way out of the box when it comes to the global world we are now in. There are exciting possibilities for those brilliant thinkers and motivated people who are willing and able to learn from the everyday success stories. My concern is for the huge population getting caught in the poor jobs, weak pay, and discouragement cycle. We clearly need more signs of hope for everyone across the board.

  5. Leanne I. Travis
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    The late great Murray Rothbard described Ludwig von Mises’s _The Theory of Money and Credit_ as the best book on money ever written. And so it is.

    • judylawrence
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      Thanks Leanne! Of course there is always the classic “Richest Man in Babylon”.

  6. Lorenzo Arnold
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    A richly original look at the origins of money and how it makes the world go ?roundNiall Ferguson follows the money to tell the human story behind the evolution of our financial system, from its genesis in ancient Mesopotamia to the latest upheavals on what he calls Planet Finance. What?s more, Ferguson reveals financial history as the essential backstory behind all history, arguing that the evolution of credit and debt was as important as any technological innovation in the rise of civilization. As Ferguson traces the crisis from ancient Egypt?s Memphis to today?s Chongqing, he offers bold and compelling new insights into the rise? and fall?of not just money but Western power as well.

    • judylawrence
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      Thanks Lorenzo, for those people who love this type of history and digging, I’m sure they will appreciate this resource.

  7. silver price
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    The world of personal finance is a lot like Halloween: Filled with treats if you’re good (and clever), but rife with tricks if you’re not careful. Here’s some advice that will keep your money tree from getting TPed, and help you bring home a pumpkin full of sweet rewards.

    • judylawrence
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      Well, that’s certainly another perspective to consider. I like the pumpkin full of sweet rewards idea.